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Thursday, December 30, 2010

NAA's Fall 2010 Newsletter

The National Aphasia Association
Fall 2010 Newsletter



Dear Adam,

The blizzards of 2010 have brought in memories of the Fall with the NAA's Fall 2010 Newsletter!

Inside you will read about the NAA's Fall Benefit, our presence at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Annual Conference in Philadelphia, the NAA Group of the Month and so much more!  Also, don't miss the special article about interpreters and translators by the Chair of our Multicultural Task Force!

To begin reading, click here or paste www.aphasia.org/docs/Newsletters/Fall_10_Newsletter.pdf into your web browser.
The Board and Staff members of the NAA would like to thank you all for another great year.  It has and will always be a pleasure working on behalf of persons with aphasia and their loved ones.

Wishing a Happy New Year to you all,


Ellayne Ganzfried, Executive Director
Amy Coble, Info & Admin Coordinator
The National Aphasia Association

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Thursday, December 23, 2010

ONLY LESS THAN 15 MINUTES, BRAIN ALREADY RECORDABLE NEW WORDS

Diposkan oleh Mahendra blog Kamis, 23 Desember 2010
Only Less Than 15 Minutes, Brain Already Recordable New Words
The brain will learn a new word in less than 15 minutes. Simply listen to these word as much as 160 times. According to scientists at the University of Cambridge, the brain will create new neural network to remember the word.
The findings of these scientists explain that the time it takes the brain to learn the words turned out to be much faster than expected.
Research done by placing electrodes on the head of 16 healthy volunteers. Their brain activity monitored during the test consisted of 2 stages.
In the first stage, the volunteers played on the words that are familiar. The second stage, they played on a foreign word that is called repeatedly.
At the beginning of the second phase, brain activity showed that the brain tries to recognize the word.But, after repeated 160 times in 14 minutes, brain activity can not be distinguished from brain activity in the first stage. "Virtually no difference," said Dr. Yury Shtyrov involved in research.
"To listen to alone is helpful to learn the language," says Dr. Shtyrov told The Telegraph. However, to say the word, need a new neural network, which is part of the brain that regulates speech.
However, this study does not aim to help tourists learn the language. According to Drs. Shtyrov, this research is to help restore the ability of stroke patients to speak.
To that end, the University of Cambridge took Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit of the Medical Research Council to develop an aphasia therapy that is named CIAT (Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy).
Aphasia is the loss of ability to speak due to illness, disability, or injury to the brain.
The next test will involve patients with stroke. As explained Dr. Shtyrov, rehabilitation can be faster by targeting parts of the brain for memory. "The key is repetition. The brain works better when the conditions relaxed and not trying to remember," he explained.
He gave an example in the field of sports. One can memorized the name of the players, teams, even good rules. "That's because every piece of information is always repeated and the people feel no need to memorize.
The brain can not memorize everything. Brain choose is important and the unimportant, "said Dr. Shtyrov.
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NAA A Special Memorial Exhibit

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The National Aphasia Association
A Special Memorial Exhibit

Event Sponsors

Greetings!

The National Aphasia Association is pleased to announce that we have been selected to benefit from a special memorial exhibit by photographer Gina Sachi Cody.

A collection of captivating, now inspiring, photographic work by Gina Sachi Cody will be displayed at the XChange for one week (December 28, 2010 through January 4, 2011) to remember this aspiring artist, who passed away unexpectedly last October 31. Entitled "A Picture Speaks 1,000 Words," the memorial exhibit will raise funds for the National Aphasia Association, donating all proceeds, including photograph purchases, in Gina Sachi Cody's name.
"Gina leaves us many unforgettable memories, her beautiful spirit and an inspiration to live life to the fullest as she did," says her sister, Aya Cody. "Gina also leaves us her photography. She would say, 'Photography is my life. I breathe it. I live it. I capture it.' Her work is a collection of how she saw the world, therefore a story of her life. Every shot captures a feeling, a glimpse into a person, an image of herself; whatever she saw beauty in at that moment."

According to Aya, their father Michael, who acquired aphasia after a stroke when they were teens, inspired Gina.

Family, friends, celebrities, people Gina photographed and the aphasia community will remember her at a special opening of the exhibit on December 28 (from 6-10 pm) on what would have been Gina's 25th birthday.  Please join us as we celebrate Gina's life with food, photography, a silent auction and more.  We will also be displaying artwork by persons with aphasia.

We hope to see you there!

Ellayne Ganzfried, Executive Director

A Picture Speaks 1,000 Words
A Memorial Exhibit by Photographer Gina Sachi Cody
GinaSachiCodyOpening Event Info
640 W 28th St
9th Floor
New York, NY 10001
December 28th, 2010
6:00pm - 10:00pm

Regular Exhibit Hours:
Tuesday, Dec 28th Opening, 6pm - 10pm
Wednesday, Dec 29th
Thursday Dec 30th
Sunday Jan 2nd - Tuesday Jan 4th, 11 am-5 pm
Closed on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day
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Sunday, December 12, 2010

This Is Where It All Began

In attempting to clean up the mess that I made for myself in others in trying to deal with three topics in one blog, I found that I had not transferred my dogs and cats posting to my aphasia blog. This essay is really where the blogging began, so here it is transferred to where it belongs, my aphasia blog.
In the aftermath of a traumatic brain episode (a blood vessel in a benign tumor exploded creating all the symptoms of a stroke) I was left with medical and the therapeutic community described as a mild case of aphasia. I know they are correct in that assessment because I know people with severe, progressive aphasia. But for someone who lived off the use of words for 40 years, it completely changed my life.
In trying to clean up my first general blog into three separate blogs, one on each of the topics of higher education, aphasia and epilepsy, I found one of my earliest postings: Words are More like Dogs than Cats.
As I reread it, I remembered the conversations that it engendered with my speech therapist when I first wrote it. That reminded me of a comment Glenn Fry of the Eagles made when he came onto stage after an intermission during the concert the Eagles gave during their “Hell freezes Over Tour.” He looked at the audience and slowing said, “This is where it all began.” The audience broke into applause before the band played the first note of the song, “Take It Easy.”
At another point in the concert, Fry gave a hint at the rationale of the title off the tour. He said, “Just to set the record straight, we never broke up. We just took a 14 year vacation.”
The next posting “Words are More Like Cats Than Dogs” is “Where it all began.”  As I worked with a speech therapist for months after my traumatic brain episode to try to regain what I thought was passable use of words and language, the following idea started ruminating in my head.
Words are not doing what I want them to do. They are being obstinate and doing what they want to do. Then it hit me. They are acting like cats. They don’t necessarily come to you when you call them. They come to you when they are good and ready to come to you.
As I discussed this with my therapist, she challenged me to describe the process that I was using to try to overcome this apparent difficulty.
As she challenged me to improve, she would have me do exercises over and over again. That’s when I remembered the things that I heard or had been told throughout my life time about practice. Slowly the stories about how and why practice was useful came back. As they came back, I would make notes about them. From those notes came this first essay that described my journey with aphasia.
As a number of individuals have noted, my 40 years in the academy show clearly in my writing. One editor with whom I have worked, accused me of having the Russian novel virus. I can’t say hello in less than 750 words.
However, as many within the aphasia community have read this essay, they have found it very helpful in dealing with their patients or loved ones. This past summer, Dr. Audrey Holland translated my essay into an aphasia friendly format. I encourage all of you to  look at her translation. It is found at     http://aphasiacorner.com/blog/?s=Words+are+more+like+cats
I have found Aphasia Corner encouraging and helpful. I encourage everyone I know that has the smallest tie to aphasia to subscribe to or bookmark their website http://www.aphasiacorner.com  One of the first things I learned is that I am not alone. There are many others who have been touched by aphasia.
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Kudos to the Aphasia Corner Blog

by dlangendorf on December 9, 2010

 
I must say “job well done” to the Aphasia Corner blog. Someone at Connect, a communication disability network that publishes the blog, gets it.
The blog is chocked full of information. That’s good. And expected.
But beyond that, the blog is readable for people with mild aphasia or for caregivers who are most likely older, less technology-savvy adults. It’s approachable for people like me, new to the world of aphasia, with posts for caregivers, using computers and augmentative devices, and talks with experts.
Entering design-speak here, Aphasia Corner uses lots of white space, large type, and spacious leading to make it much easier to read or skim. It also seems to be written from a larger perspective, not from a clinical or therapeutic point of view. No “inside baseball” here.
For some reason — and I find this ironic — many websites and blogs covering aphasia and other speaking disorders are molasis-dense with information, headlines, links — all the usual clutter that makes sites so difficult to read and navigate.
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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Recovering Syntax: A Poet's Struggle with Aphasia


INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT

In response to many of you....
We highly recommend that you view this web cite.
 Roundtable Discussion held on Saturday, October 23rd, 2010.
This clip features: Dorthy Ross (speech language pathologist), Marie Ponsot (poet), and Jason W. Brown (neurologist).
Recovering Syntax: A Poet's Struggle with AphasiaSocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Monday, November 22, 2010

Jersey man raises £25,000 from marathon walk

Anthony Lewis 
Anthony Lewis completed his first marathon in October 2010
A man who completed the Jersey Marathon despite suffering a stroke three years ago has raised £25,000.
Anthony Lewis, 42, walked the 26.2 miles (42.16km) over the course of a week.
Three years ago he suffered a stroke as a result of a football accident that left him physically disabled and with severe aphasia, affecting his communication.
Despite this, Mr Lewis, learnt to walk again and completed his first marathon.
Mr Lewis, former assistant editor of the Jersey Evening Post, walked the island course over a week - finishing on the day of the main marathon event.
His efforts have raised £25,000 for the Stroke Association in Jersey - five times the amount he hoped to receive.
His partner, Suzie Austin, said the generosity and good wishes of islanders spurred him on when the weather was bad or he felt tired during the feat.

More on This Story

Related stories

Anthony Lewis starts marathon run 27 SEPTEMBER 2010, PEOPLE AND PLACE
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Monday, November 1, 2010

INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT (IAM) SCHEDULE 2010-2011

INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT (IAM) SCHEDULE
   EFFECTIVE 10-4-2010

ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE OF CHARGE
SURVIVORS AND CO-SURVIVORS ARE WELCOME
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: HARVEY ALTER (212) 217-2610
IAM / ICD APHASIA PROGRAM
CENTER FOR SPEECH / LANGUAGE,LEARNING,and HEARING
340 East 24th Street, NYC, NY
Operates every Tuesday, all year long, from 5 PM - 7 PM
in the Cafeteria
IAM / BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER, APHASIA PROGRAM
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
10 Union Square, South, NYC, NY
Meets from 6 PM to 8 PM 
Take Elevator to the  6th Floor
    
        Monday, September 27, 2010       Monday, February 14, 2010
        Monday, October 4, 2010          Monday, February 28, 2011
        Monday, October 18, 2010         Monday, March 14, 2011
        Monday, November 8, 2010         Monday, March 28, 2011
        Monday, November 22, 2010        Monday, April 11, 2011
        Monday, December 6, 2010         Monday, April, 25, 2011
        Monday, December 20, 2010        Monday, May 9, 2011
        Monday, January 3, 2011          Monday, May  23, 2011
        Monday, January 24, 2011         Monday, June 6, 2011
                                         Monday, June 20, 2011
                                      
IAM / SAINT LUKES CHURCH APHASIA PROGRAM
487 Hudson Street
Between Christopher St. and Barrow St.
Opposite Grove St. on the West Side of the Street
Meets from 10 AM to 2 PM, in Laughlin Hall
Complimentary Lunch is served
                                                                         
                                                       Saturday, September 25, 2010
                                                       Saturday, October 19, 2010
                                                       Saturday, November 6, 2010
                                                       Saurday,  January 15, 2011
                                                       Saturday  February 26, 2011
                                                       Saturday, March 19, 2011
                                                       Saturday, April 9, 2011
                                                       Saturday, May 21, 2011
                                                       Saturday, June 18, 2011
IAM / MARYMOUNT COLLEGE APHASIA PROGRAM
Department of Communication and Sciences and Disorders
221 East 71 Street, NYC, NY
Meets from 10 am to 2 PM
Complimentary Lunch is served
(Prior registration required)
                                                 
                                                        FALL SEMESTER 
                                                        Saturday, October 2, 2010
                                                        Saturday, October 30, 2010
                                                        Saturday  November 13, 2010
                                                        Saturday, December, 4, 2010
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Sunday, October 31, 2010

Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program - Module 3 10-31-10


Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program - Module 3
The www.aphasiatoolbox.com Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program (BCAT) takes advantage of the powerful recovery and re-connective potential of brain plasticity.  BCAT brings together the best of aphasia research, neuroscience, learning theory and the clinical expertise of our speech/language pathologists (SLP). We blend this combination with the determination and effort or the person with aphasia using our innovative techniques and tools to achieve his/her goals.  To view some examples of our client's outcomes visithttp://www.aphasiatoolbox.com/?q=accomplishments .
BCAT consists of 15 component treatment modules, 61 guiding treatment principles, 88 unique treatment protocols (sets of activities with specific goals) with accompanying materials; and 2 software programs with over 500 stimulus sets.

 The component treatment modules include:
 1. The Viking Module for Apraxia
 2. Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds
 3. The AphasiaPhonics Module for Phonological Elements of Aphasia
 4. The Lexical -- Semantic Module for Word Recall Anomia
 5. The Speaking in Sentences Module for Syntactic Reconnection
 6. The Prosody Module for Sentence Intonation, Word Stress and Phrasal   timing
 7. Keyboarding for Alexia, Agraphia and Screen Literacy
 8. The Numerology Module for Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers and Concepts
 9. The Speech Acts Module for Intent and Communicative Responsiveness
10. The Pragmatics Module for Language In Action
11. The Cognitive Underpinnings Module for Memory, Attention and Mental 13. Resource Allocation
12. The Morphing Module for Morphological Difficulties
13. The Reading Module for Acquired Alexia
14. The Movement Module for Limb Apraxia
15. Groups for Peer Engagement, Practice and Support


For more information visithttp://www.aphasiatoolbox.com/?q=bcat or contact us at 724.494.2534 or emailinformation@aphasiatoolbox.com .
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This is the third in a series of newsletters that explain in more detail each of the component modules of our Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program (BCAT).  The topic for this newsletter is the AphasiaPhonics for Phonological Elements of Aphasia Module.
Early in childhood, children learn to talk acquiring skills in recognizing (decoding) and saying (encoding) speech sounds.  They also learn to read (decode) and write (encode) in letters incorporating their knowledge of and skill in producing speech sounds 1.   This learning experience creates a very strong relationship between speaking and reading that lasts a lifetime.  It is this powerful bond, forged by phonics, between sounds and letters that we utilize in the AphasiaPhonics Module as we help people with aphasia (PWA) read, write, and most importantly, talk again.  Moreover, this phonics connection from childhood is the reason why we have made use of the many treatment techniques used by speech pathologists who work with phonological disorders in children in development of the AphasiaPhonics module. 

We created the AphasiaPhonics Module to take advantage of this residual sound-letter connection that PWA still have.  We created dozens of innovative treatment protocols and hundreds of stimuli lists on our software program (the Aphasia Sight Reader) that we use to make a therapeutic learning environment that takes full advantage of this phonics connection.  The PWA's ability to transcribe these sounds into phonetic symbols complement the his/her efforts .

Phonics involves teaching how to connect the sounds of spoken English with letters or groups of letters and teaching learners how to blend the sounds of letters to pronounce unknown or unfamiliar words. The goal of AphasiaPhonics is to help the client reconnectthe sounds of spoken English with letters or groups of letters and to blend the sounds of letters to pronounce words left unfamiliar due to phonological aphasia .  Reconnecting word familiarity is a core building block in the AphasiaPhonics module.  The AphasiaPhonics aphasia rehabilitation module uses multiple approaches including reading, writing, keyboarding, spelling, talking, gesturing, listening, and thinking.  

The benefits of this module are:

It helps the client to think in sounds4.
It helps the client to reconnect normal mental processes for decoding and encoding 5, 6. 
It improves the client's ability to develop phoneme sequence knowledge.
It improve the client's phonological working memory.
It provides a platform to address phonological working memory problems 7.
It improves the client's ability to say words with more than two syllables.
It helps the client to take advantage of residual abilities with the letter-sound relationship.


Some the short-term objectives for the AphasiaPhonics module are:

The client will be able to:
explain the relationship between sounds and letters and words.
say aloud, using short term working memory, two words with different spellings but the same sounds (homonyms).
say aloud, using short term working memory, 3 words that increase in length from 1 to 3 syllables (increasing syllables).
using working memory, decide it a string of letters is a real word, then type word and a brief definition.
using verbal working memory and alternating attention, think of a rhyming word given a semantic cue.
type the phonetic symbols for a printed word, then type the spelling of its homonym.
using verbal working memory,  provide a synonym, antonym and rhyming word for a target word.


The AphasiaPhonics Program for phonological elements of aphasia
a.    The Visual Definition of Aphasia
b.    AphasiaPhonics - concepts
c.     Vowels
                                               i.     Jaw positions
                                             ii.     Around the Mouth
                                            iii.     Alternating Vowels
                                            iv.     Vowel Sequences From Memory
                                              v.     Continuous Phonation - Diphthongs
                                            vi.     V to VC words
d.    Vowels Become Pronouns ( subjective; objective; possessive; demonstratives; interrogatives )
e.    Minimal Pair Vowel Insertions
f.      The Bronx Cheer
g.    Oh Boy! ( Assigned Letters, Through the Alphabet )
h.    Increasing Syllables
i.      Lexical-Semantic Meltdowns
j.      Phonological Assembly
k.     Pronunciation Rules
l.      Irregular Past Tense Verbs
m.  Spelling Random Anagrams - Making Lexical Decisions
n.    Spelling Random Anagrams - Semantic Category
o.    Spelling Random Anagrams Using Spelling Patterns
p.    Rhyme, Synonym, Antonym Word Recall
q.    Homonyms
r.      Minimal Pairs
s.    Morphing: Nouns to Verbs
t.      Morphing: Verbs to Nouns
u.    Morphing: Derivational Switching
v.     Morphing: suffixing
w.   Morphing: prefixing
x.     Sound Embedded Verbs
y.     Heteronyms
a.   
b.    GROUPS:
a.    Words Turn Me On
b.    Bootcamps


If you are a speech pathologist and feel that your clients may benefit from this type of program, or if you would like to consult with us for its use in your practice, email us atinformation@aphasiatoolbox.com or call 724.494.2534

1 Talcott, Joel, Witton, Caroline, McLean, Maggie, Hansen, Peter, Rees, Adrian, Green Gary, and Stein, John, Dynamic Sensory Sensitivity and Children's Word Decoding Skills, Precedings of the National Academy of Sciences, March14,2000, vol.97 no. 6, 2952-2957 

Connors, William, Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds Module,www.aphasiatoolbox.com Newsletter, October, 2010,

Berndt, R.S., Handbook of Neuropsychology, 2nd edition, 2001  Vol 3, 123

Kendall, Diane, Rosenbek, John, Heilman, Kenneth, Conway, Tim, Klenberg, Karen, Gonzalez Rothi, Leslie, and Nadeau, Stepehn ; Phoneme-based rehabilitation of anomia in aphasia, Brain and Language, 105, (2008) 1-17

Corsten, S., Mende, M., Cholewa, J,. and Huber, W., Treatment of input and output phonology in aphasia: A single case study,
Aphasiology, Vol. 21, No. 6-8. (2007), pp. 587-603. 

Elizabeth M. Christy, Nora L. Watson, Rhonda B. Friedman, The Role of Phonological Working Memory in Phonological Alexia Brain and Language 99 (2006) 8--219
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Monday, October 25, 2010


Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program - Module 2
The www.aphasiatoolbox.com Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program (BCAT) takes advantage of the powerful recovery and re-connective potential of brain plasticity.  BCAT brings together the best of aphasia research, neuroscience, learning theory and the clinical expertise of our speech/language pathologists (SLP). We blend this combination with the determination and effort or the person with aphasia using our innovative techniques and tools to achieve his/her goals.  To view some examples of our client's outcomes visit http://www.aphasiatoolbox.com/?q=accomplishments .
BCAT consists of 15 component treatment modules, 61 guiding treatment principles, 88 unique treatment protocols (sets of activities with specific goals) with accompanying materials; and 2 software programs with over 500 stimulus sets.

 The component treatment modules include:
 1. The Viking Module for Apraxia
 2. Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds
 3. The AphasiaPhonics Module for Phonological Elements of Aphasia
 4. The Lexical -- Semantic Module for Word Recall Anomia
 5. The Speaking in Sentences Module for Syntactic Reconnection
 6. The Prosody Module for Sentence Intonation, Word Stress and Phrasal   timing
 7. Keyboarding for Alexia, Agraphia and Screen Literacy
 8. The Numerology Module for Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers and Concepts
 9. The Speech Acts Module for Intent and Communicative Responsiveness
10. The Pragmatics Module for Language In Action
11. The Cognitive Underpinnings Module for Memory, Attention and Mental 13. Resource Allocation
12. The Morphing Module for Morphological Difficulties
13. The Reading Module for Acquired Alexia
14. The Movement Module for Limb Apraxia
15. Groups for Peer Engagement, Practice and Support


For more information visit http://www.aphasiatoolbox.com/?q=bcat or contact us at 724.494.2534 or email information@aphasiatoolbox.com .

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This is the second in a series of newsletters that explain in more detail each of the component modules of our Brain Compatible Aphasia Treatment Program (BCAT).  Our second topic, in the series, is the Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds Module. 

Our clients who are successful with the Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds Module can do just that -- think in sounds.  They are able to independently think of a word, hear that word in their heads, and then write the word in symbols that represent the sounds.  This ability is a powerful tool for the person with aphasia and his/her SLP during the treatment process and for the client during independent practice.  
The clinical benefits in this activity are:
1. It provides a common language for the SLP and clients to share.  This saves treatment time and facilitates feedback.
2. It helps the client to think in sounds1.
3. It helps the client to reconnect normal mental processes for decoding and encoding 2, 3. 
4. It improves the client's ability to develop phoneme sequence knowledge 2.
5. It compensates for weakness in phonological working memory.
6. It provides a platform to address phonological working memory problems 4.

The clinical goals for the Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds module are --
Using the aphasiatoolbox.com phonetic symbols, the client will be able to 5:
1. type the phonetic symbols from short term working memory.
2. type the type the phonetic symbols for a spoken vowel.
3. type the phonetic symbols for a spoken consonant.
4. type the phonetic symbols for a spoken word.
5. type the phonetic symbols for a written word.
6. type the phonetic symbols for a thought.
7. type the phonetic symbols for a gesture.
8. type the phonetic symbols for a semantic web target stimulus.

Simply put, the client learns to transcribe printed words into phonetic symbols using the aphasiatoolbox.com phonetic chart. This chart uses a modified version of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).  We have changed some of the IPA symbols into more transparent icons that are easier for clients to recognize and learn.  This protocol allows us to attack phonological aphasia in new ways.  The module focuses on the client working from his/her own thought processes with the elimination of imitation, closure tasks and external cueing.   Clients gain appreciation of words as communicative symbols.  They come to realize that letters are things we write with our hands and sounds are things we say with our mouths. 
If you feel that your clients may benefit from this type of program, or if you would like to consult with us for its use on your practice, email us at information@aphasiatoolbox.com or call 724.494.2534
 
2 Kendall, Diane, Rosenbek, John, Heilman, Kenneth, Conway, Tim, Klenberg, Karen, Gonzalez Rothi, Leslie, and Nadeau, Stepehn ; Phoneme-based rehabilitation of anomia in aphasia, Brain and Language, 105, (2008) 1-17
3 Corsten, S., Mende, M., Cholewa, J,. and Huber, W., Treatment of input and output phonology in aphasia: A single case study,
Aphasiology, Vol. 21, No. 6-8. (2007), pp. 587-603. 
4 Van Gleek, Anne, Gilla Ronald, and Hoffman, LaVae, Training in phonological awareness generalizes to phonological working memory: a preliminary investigation, Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis, The, Fall, 2006
5 Joly-Pottuz, Mercier, Melina, Laynaurdm Aurelie, and Habib, Micheal, Combined auditory and articulatory training improves phonological deficit in children with dyslexia,  Submitted to Neuropsychological Rehabilitation  , May 2007


The Full Phoneticize for Thinking in Sounds Module
a.    Phoenticize -- concepts
b.    Phoenticize -- the symbols
c.     Phoenticize -- the vowels
                                               i.     Phoenticize -- the long vowels
                                             ii.     Phoenticize -- the long-short vowel distinction
                                            iii.     Phoenticize -- the vowels around the mouth
d.    Phoenticize -- what is that vowel in the middle?
e.    Phoenticize -- the consonants
f.      Phoenticize - numbers
g.    Phoenticize -- words to sounds
h.    Phoenticize -- thoughts to sounds
i.      Phoenticize --sounds to words
j.      Phoenticize --sounds to gestures
k.     Phoenticize -- sound embedded verbs
l.      Phoenticize - prosody
m.  Phoenticize - homonyms
n.    Phoenticize -- past tense irregular verbs
o.    Phoenticize -- Phrabble
p.    Phoenticize -- phonetic anagram
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