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Thursday, August 25, 2011

FREE IAM APHASIA SCHEDULE 2011-2012


International Aphasia Movement (IAM)
Schedule of Programs 2011-2012
All programs are free of charge and will be taught by graduate clinicans
under the supervision of licensed and qualified clinical staff and faculty.
 
IAM/ ICD Aphasia Program
ICD Center for Speech/ Language/ Learning and Hearing
340 East 24th Street and First Avenue, NYC
Beginning September 13, 2011, (Operates every Tuesday and Thursday 5 - 7 PM)
 
IAM/ Beth Israel Aphasia Program
Beth Israel Hospital
10 Union Square, NYC
Beginning Monday October 3. (Selected  Mondays from 6 PM - 8 PM)
Monday, October 3, 31
Monday, November 14, 28
Monday, December 12
Monday, January 9,23, 2012
Monday, February 6
Monday, March 5, 19
Monday, April 2,16,30
Monday, May 14
Monday, June 4, 18
 
IAM/ Saint Luke's in the Fields Aphasia Program
Hudson Street between Christopher Street and Grove Street in the Village, NYC
This program offers a complimentary Breakfast and Lunch
Beginning Saturday, September 24, from 10 AM to 2 PM
Saturday, October 15
Saturday, November 19
Saturday, December 10
Saturday, January 14, 2012 
Saturday, February 25
Saturday, March 17
Saturday, April 28
Saturday, May 26
Saturday, June 9
 
Columbia University Teacher's College / IAM Aphasia Program
Department of Biobehavioral Sciences
525 West 120th Street, NYC
Macy Hall 101
This program offers a complimentary Light Breakfast and Lunch
This program begins Saturday, October 1, 2011
Further dates will be announced at the first meeting
You must have completed Columbia's Intake Package
 
For more information you may email us at aphasiamovemet@aol.com
or you may call us at Harvey Alter,  212-217-2610
FREE IAM APHASIA SCHEDULE 2011-2012SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

FREE COLUMBIA APHASIA GROUP


SECOND NOTICE
 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY TEACHER'S COLLEGE
In conjunction with
THE INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT
 
will be starting a
 
FREE  SATURDAY APHASIA PROGRAM
 
This will be taught be graduate clinicians under the supervision of licensed and qualified clinical staff and faculty. 
 
The program will begin on October 1, 2011 and will run from 10 AM - 2 PM.
Complimentary Light Breakfast and Lunch will be served.
 
This program will not conflict with other Saturday programs.
There will be a Co-Survivors Group meeting simultaneously.
 
To be considered for this program, you must fill out certain information that
Columbia University requires.
 
If you interested in becoming a member, please indicate such by sending
an  email to:
 
INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT
 
Forms will be sent to you and must be completed and returned by the US Mail to:
 
Harvey Alter
President
International Aphasia Movement  
165 Christopher Street   Suite 2D
New York, NY  10014
FREE COLUMBIA APHASIA GROUPSocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Monday, August 22, 2011

REMINDER - TUESDAY APHASIA ICD 5 PM


REMINDER
ICD - CENTER FOR SPEECH/LANGUAGE,
LEARNING and HEARING
and the
INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT
SPONSOR THE
APHASIA / STROKE GROUP
TUESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2011
AND EVERY TUESDAY
5 PM - 7PM
Dr. Dorothy Ross will conduct a Discussion Group that deals with Aphasia and Stroke and many other topics that are important to Survivors and Co-Survivors
                    In the Cafeteria
The address of ICD is:
340 East 24th Street
New York, NY, 10010
ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS CONTACT:
Dr. Dorothy Ross at 347-247-5245
                                or Harvey Alter at 212-217-2610
                         or email us at aphasiamovement@aol.com
MEETS EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE
CO-SURVIVORS ARE ALWAYS WECOME
REMINDER - TUESDAY APHASIA ICD 5 PMSocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Sunday, August 21, 2011

COLUMBIA & IAM APHASIA PROGRAM REGISTRATION


Columbia University
in conjunction with
The International Aphasia Movement
We are pleased to send you the Columbia Teachers College Intake Forms. Attached are 3 forms required by Columbia. Please print these forms and then complete each form. Once you have completed each form, please mail them to:
                                          Harvey Alter
                                          International Aphasia Movement
                                          165 Christopher Street   Suite  2D
                                          New York, NY 10014
Please write this address exactly as it is listed above.  The Columbia University - International Aphasia Movement Aphasia Program will begin with its first session on  Saturday, October 1, 2011 from 10 AM to 2 PM.
The address is 120th Street and Broadway, 101 Macy Hall. Additional information will be forwarded to you upon receiving your completed Intake Package.
Questions and Concerns call:   212-217-2610 or you may write us at
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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Singing therapy helps stroke patients regain language…


Singing therapy helps stroke patients regain language!
Part 1
BRAIN
February 22, 2010|By Elizabeth Landau, CNN
When mothers speak to children, it’s often in a singsong tone. That’s no coincidence, scientists say, given that music and language are so intricately linked in the brain.
Scientists are using this fundamental connection between song and speech to treat patients who have lost their ability to communicate. There’s evidence that music can be used to help people with severe brain impairments learn how to speak again, scientists said over the weekend at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Doctors at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, are treating stroke patients who have little or no spontaneous speech by associating melodies with words and phrases.
“Music, and music-making, is really a very special form of a tool or an intervention that can be used to treatneurological disorders, said Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, associate professor of neurology at Beth Israel and Harvard University. “There’s rarely any other activity that could really activate or engage this many regions of the brain that is experienced as being a joyous activity.”
There are between 750,000 and 800,000 strokes per year in the United States, and about 200,000 of them result in a kind of language disorder called aphasia, he said. About one-third of those patients have aphasia so severe that they become non-fluent, meaning about 60,000 to 70,000 patients per year could benefit from the music therapy.
It is being scientifically explored only at Beth Israel, but there are speech therapists throughout the United States who are using some kind of music treatment. About 25 to 30 patients have been described in published research papers, but there may be hundreds or thousands of others treated in nonscientific settings, Schlaug said.
The left side of the brain plays a key role in speech and language ability. But the right side of the brain has the capability to become enhanced and change its structure to compensate for left-side deficits, researchers have found.

Singing therapy helps stroke patients regain language…SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Communication Difficulties and Seniors


Communication Difficulties and Seniors

There are many different hearing, language, and speech problems that affect the senior community. By understanding the symptoms, seniors can seek the treatment they need and identify the problem as early as possible. At  Odd Fellows Home we provide audiology services which involve an Otoscopic evaluation and a hearing screening. A licensed speech therapist also provides treatments to residents who have speech difficulties. A holistic treatment plan is created involving the physician and different departments like nursing, activities, rehabilitation, etc.
SeniorsList.com has listed below some common communication difficulties experienced by the senior population:
Hearing difficulties affect over 10 million seniors in the United States and the most common cause of this is presbycusis which is age-related hearing loss. This loss of hearing happens slowly, and first results in the difficulty to hear high-frequency sounds as someone talking. As this condition gets worse, lower-frequency sounds can become difficult to hear as well. Some of the symptoms include: difficulty hearing in noisy places, ringing in the ears, and voices sounding slurred or mumbled. It will also be easier to understand a man’s voice than a woman’s. While there is no cure for this condition, there are some treatments available with the most common being hearing aids. Of course any purchase of a hearing aid should be completed by licensed audiologist.
Aphasia is a condition where seniors experience impairment in language ability. Symptoms may include the inability to understand language, inability to form words or pronounce words, and inability to read or write. The major causes of aphasia are strokes and head injuries. And because of the complex nature of aphasia there is no universal treatment method. It presents itself differently in patients and, therefore, requires a team effort in providing a treatment plan. This may include a doctor, social worker, speech pathologist, psychologist, and occupational therapist. Overall treatment has been known to create positive outcomes when learning to adjust to these limitations in communication.
Dysarthria is a disorder that interferes with the normal production of speech. People who have dysarthria often have challenges with vocal quality, range, tone, strength in speech, and timing. Causes of dysarthria include degenerative disease (Parkinson’s, Huntington’s disease, and ALS), embolic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Treatment is typically done by speech pathologists and includes a variety of techniques.
If you notice a change in speech, memory, organization, or communication in general than it should be reported to your physician or the senior’s physician immediately. These problems can often occur when there is an underlying problem, so it’s important to address this as soon as possible.
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Brain Disorder Among Chinese


UCF Lands First-of-Its-Kind NIH Grant to Study Brain Disorder Among Chinese

A new University of Central Florida study could help tens of thousands of Chinese-Americans who have difficulty speaking after they suffer from strokes or other illnesses.
Assistant Professor Anthony Kong of Communication Sciences & Disorders has been awarded a first-of-its-kind $727,000 National Institutes of Health grant to research aphasia among Chinese speakers.
Aphasia is a condition in which people have difficulty understanding and speaking, usually after a stroke or head trauma. The trauma damages the left side of the brain, which is largely responsible for language comprehension and production. A tumor, brain infection or dementia can also cause the condition.
About 1 million people in the United States have aphasia. Up to 38 percent of people who suffer a stroke develop it.
“Aphasia can have devastating effects on daily communication and conversational skills that can severely hamper qualify of life,” Kong said. “The overarching goal of this study is to improve assessment methods and provide some treatment guidelines for Chinese speakers with aphasia worldwide.”
Several studies have looked at how the brain processes the English language and how aphasia impacts language ability among English speakers. But no large-scale, comprehensive studies have been conducted among any Asian language speakers.
Contrary to popular belief, people do not acquire and process all languages the same. Existing research shows the brain’s processing pattern for acquiring Chinese languages is quite different from Latin-based languages, which makes it essential to have the kind of information this study will produce available for assessment and treatment, Kong said.
There are very distinct ways that aphasia manifests itself among Cantonese speakers compared to English speakers, Kong said. He saw it first-hand while earning his doctorate and working in a Singapore hospital that saw hundreds of patients with aphasia who spoke English, Mandarin, Cantonese, Malay and Hindi, among other languages.
Much of Kong’s work will be conducted in his native Hong Kong because the community has a homogenous Cantonese-speaking population. Data and recommendations from the study, however, will have implications for all Chinese speakers with aphasia around the world. The information also will help further research about conditions across different languages.
Beginning in June, Kong and his team will interview and conduct extensive videotaped observations of more than 360 native Cantonese speakers with and without the condition. He will then create a database of information, which will include the distinctive linguistic symptoms of Chinese aphasia, the rhythm, stress and intonation of Chinese aphasic speech, and non-verbal behaviors of Chinese speakers with aphasia as a result of stroke. He will also document the same three categories in non-aphasiac subjects to create a baseline for comparison.
The information his team will collect is not available anywhere at this time and is essential in developing proper diagnosis and treatment of the condition among Chinese speakers. There are only a few existing tools to assess the condition among Cantonese speakers, one of which Kong developed when he was a graduate student. In comparison, more than 200 assessment tools exist for English speakers.
Kong’s team includes Dr. Sam Po Law of the University of Hong Kong, Dr. Alice Su Ying Lee of University College Cork in the Republic of Ireland and several students at the University of Hong Kong. Several hospitals and service agencies also are helping with the study. Pilot programs conducted the past two summers were funded by grants from UCF’s College of Health and Public Affairs.
Kong joined the UCF faculty in the fall of 2007. He is originally from Hong Kong. He completed his Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Hong Kong. He stayed at the University of Hong Kong to earn his doctorate in the areas of aphasiology and adult neurogenic communication disorders. Prior to moving to the United States, he worked as the department head of the Speech Therapy Unit at the Hong Kong Society for the Deaf and served as the vice chairperson for the Hong Kong Association of Speech Therapists.
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Aphasia


What is aphasia?

Aphasia is a disorder that results from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language. For most people, these are areas on the left side (hemisphere) of the brain. Aphasia usually occurs suddenly, often as the result of a stroke or head injury, but it may also develop slowly, as in the case of a brain tumor, an infection, or dementia. The disorder impairs the expression and understanding of language as well as reading and writing. Aphasia may co-occur with speech disorders such as dysarthria or apraxia of speech, which also result from brain damage.

Who has aphasia?

Anyone can acquire aphasia, including children, but most people who have aphasia are middle-aged or older. Men and women are equally affected. According to the National Aphasia Association, approximately 80,000 individuals acquire aphasia each year from strokes. About one million people in the United States currently have aphasia.

What causes aphasia?

Aphasia is caused by damage to one or more of the language areas of the brain. Many times, the cause of the brain injury is a stroke. A stroke occurs when blood is unable to reach a part of the brain. Brain cells die when they do not receive their normal supply of blood, which carries oxygen and important nutrients. Other causes of brain injury are severe blows to the head, brain tumors, brain infections, and other conditions that affect the brain.
Aphasia
http://www.medicinenet.com/aphasia/page2.htm
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FREE APHASIA / STROKE GROUP


ICD - CENTER FOR SPEECH/LANGUAGE,
LEARNING and HEARING
and the
INTERNATIONAL APHASIA MOVEMENT
SPONSOR THE
FREE APHASIA / STROKE GROUP
TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 2011
AND EVERY TUESDAY
5 PM - 7PM
Dr. Dorothy Ross will conduct aDiscussion Group that deals with Aphasia and Stroke and many other topics that are important to Survivors and Co-Survivors
                   In the Cafeteria
The address of ICD is:
340 East 24th Street
New York, NY, 10010
ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS CONTACT:
Dr. Dorothy Ross at 347-247-5245
                             or Harvey Alter at 212-217-2610
                    or email us at aphasiamovement@aol.com
MEETS EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE
CO-SURVIVORS ARE ALWAYS WECOME.
FREE APHASIA / STROKE GROUPSocialTwist Tell-a-Friend
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